College



Where can I get information about colleges?
ETHS College Career Center

What does the College Career Center do?
College resources are housed in the College/Career Center, and include scholarship information, schedules of college/career visits, descriptions of summer programs, up-to-date files of special information, and shelves of college catalogs, videotapes and reference books. You can get information about grants, loans and scholarships in the College/Career Center and from counselors. The counselors, College Coordinator, and Post-Secondary Counselor all provide students and families with assistance in filling out college applications, financial-aid forms, scholarship applications, and other college or career-oriented forms.

What about college visits?
In order to attend a college representative’s session, students must sign up ahead of time and let their teachers know they will be missing class. These absences do not count against the total of 8 permitted, but students may miss only a limited number of classes in each subject. Dates of college visits can be found on ETHS website and posted at the CCC.

Can I get involved in college visits?
PTSA’s College Hosting Committee holds an informational meeting early in the school year for parents interested in acting as host in the College Career Center during visits from college representatives. Parents take student attendance and can listen to the reps describe their colleges, but not ask questions. Attendance at the introductory meeting is mandatory for parent volunteers who want to host, but filing help and computer data entry is always needed at the College Career Center for those who cannot make the meeting.

When should students begin thinking about college?
Students may find their goals changing throughout high school. A student may not be interested in investigating colleges during junior year.

What should students do during Junior year?
College representatives visit high schools to describe their colleges to students. The College Career Center has many resources for ETHS students to use. In order to attend a college representative’s session, students must sign up ahead of time and let their teachers know they will be missing class. These absences do not count against the total of 8 permitted, but students may miss only a limited number of classes in each subject. Dates of college visits can be found on ETHS website and posted at the CCC. The College and Career Counseling Office is listed under “Students” on the banner at the top of the ETHS website.
PTSA’s College Hosting Committee holds an informational meeting early in the school year for parents interested in acting as host in the College and Career Center during visits from college representatives. Parents take student attendance and can listen to the reps describe their colleges, but not ask questions. Attendance at the introductory meeting is mandatory for parent volunteers who want to host, but filing help and computer data entry is always needed at the College and Career Center for those who cannot make the meeting.

A poular time to go on college visits is Sprint Break junior year when college students are likely to be on campus. Summer after junior year lets you see the campus, but classes are usually not in session
  • Take the SAT® (Scholastic Aptitude Test) and/or ACT. Look for books which rank colleges, they list the average test scores of accepted students at each school. The College and Career Center has many of these books. ETHS students often take prep classes which range from individual instruction from a tutor to classroom settings to a prep class offered by ETHS, as a class, to improve their scores.
  • Contact colleges to schedule a visit which includes a tour and can include your student sitting in on a classroom session if you’ve arranged for it enough in advance.
  • Work hard and keep up good grades. College applications mailed in the fall of senior year include a transcript through junior year only.

What are the deadlines for colleges?
  • College deadlines for applications vary. Some colleges have rolling admissions and applying early is thought to give a student an advantage. Dec. 31 is a common deadline for many colleges.
  • Early decision and early action plans allow students to apply early (usually in November) and get an admissions decision from the college well in advance of the usual spring notification date. You’ll know by December or January if you've been accepted at your first-choice college. Sometimes, students who apply under these plans have a better chance of acceptance than they would through the regular admissions process. Check with each college for specific details.
  • Early decision plans are binding. You agree to attend the college if it accepts you and offers an adequate financial aid package. Although you can apply to only one college for early decision, you may apply to other colleges through the regular admissions process. If accepted by your first-choice college early, you must withdraw all other applications. Usually, colleges insist on a nonrefundable deposit well before May 1.
  • Early action plans are similar but are not binding, unlike early decision. If accepted, you can choose to commit to the college immediately, or wait until the spring. Under these plans, you may also apply early action to other colleges. Usually, you have until the late spring to let the college know your decision.

What should students do Senior year?
  • Work on and complete applications. College essays take thought and should be started in early fall. Senior English classes may include college essay writing.
  • Ask teachers to fill out recommendation forms, required by most colleges. Some teachers will write only a limited number of recommendations, so ask early.
  • File early decision or early action applications according to each school’s deadlines and procedures.
  • Take the SAT or ACT if necessary (Note: October is the last test date that will have scores available in time for early decision and early action programs).
  • Work on regular-decision applications as a backup if not accepted early decision or early action.
  • File college financial aid forms that may be required of early decision candidates.
  • File FAFSA (Federal Application for Federal Student Aid). Financial aid is based on income and is offered as grants, loans and work study programs. You will need to have your federal income tax form completed in order to complete the FAFSA form. ETHS holds parent meetings to explain financial aid for college (listed on the calendar).